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History

History of the National E and the Association

Origin

The National E (Lazy E) was designed by Jack Holt in 1962 to meet a growing demand for a fast stable boat. It embodies the experience gained from his earlier successes, the GP14 and the Enterprise. It has been said the National E “combines the virtues of both, the vices of neither, and far better performance than both”. Over 560 sail numbers have been issued to date in Australia.

One Design Concept

A comprehensive set of rules for construction and measurement has been adopted to ensure that each boat conforms to the one design concept. Each boat needs to be submitted to a Class Measurer to obtain a measurement certificate to certify that the boat is a credited National E. This ensures each boat holds its competitiveness and resale value.

Performance

Generally rated as an intermediate/senior racing yacht the National E is versatile in a wide range of water and weather conditions, and performs well in mixed fleets off a yardstick of 113. A very stable boat the “E” is forgiving for the novice, and is easily launched from the beach because of a reasonably high freeboard and pivoting centreboard and rudder making launching safe even in moderate surf. The National E will plane well, reaching in a breeze. Minimum racing crew is 2, but more can be accommodated when cruising.

Safety

Built-in buoyancy, robust construction and one-design concept ensures stability and compliance with the safety requirements of National and State Yachting Associations. In the event of a capsize the boat is easily righted and can be sailed dry without bailing.

The National E Sailing Association

 

The National E Sailing Association was constituted in November 1964 to act as a ruling body to arrange open meetings and to generally develop the National E one design class sailing dinghy in Australia. Branches have been formed in all states to encourage the growth and to administer the affairs of the class, to arrange for and regulate the conduct of National E racing and to communicate news of the class to National E members Australia wide.

Methods of Construction

The National E was designed primarily as a high performance family boat which could be readily built by an enthusiast possessing limited woodworking experience or tools. Plans are available. Methods of construction proving most popular are:

  • Purchase a floppy hull in fibreglass, then add a timber deck and fittings at home,
  • Purchase a fibreglass hull complete with a timber deck and side buoyancy tanks (composite),
  • Purchase an all fibreglass hull and deck

For those starved for time, ready-to-sail boats are available from professional builders in fibreglass as above.